Toby Considine

Toby Considine

I have been involved in IoT in buildings, and IoT communications standards for more than a decade.
 
During the 90’s I taught at the Institute for Facilities Management on subjects related to the enterprise-responsive facility, as well as leading efforts for the widespread use of GIS in maintenance, operation, and sensing of college campuses in North America.
 
I then started up the OBIX (Open Building Information Exchange) committee, and took this effort to OASIS. The OBIX specification, an abstract web service for interactions with [building] control systems is the most widely used middleware interface for communications to and between building based systems.
 
I then spent several years working on the edges of the NIST BIFER (Building Information for Emergency Responders) efforts. At some level, BIFER dealt with issues of how a building could place its own E911 (enhanced 911, emergency calls), linked closely to the efforts to extend CAP alerts into custom EDXL formats. An interesting notion, not then ready to go anywhere, was how a building itself could receive a broadcast EDXL alert, and respond appropriately based upon its own capabilities.
 
In 2005 I began participating in US national smart grid activities, eventually writing much of the NIST Smart grid Roadmap for NIST as part of the EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) team.
 
In 2012 I published the paper “Understanding Microgrids as the Fundamental Architecture for Smart Energy”. This work uses service integration and transactive services to recursively integrate microgrids. At its heart, it believes that each microgrid is managed by a micromarket, and that micromarket is primarily responsible for managing and smoothing resource utilization. A microgrid can itself act as a node in a containing microgrid, revealing on aggregate market position. This is the only model of smart energy that protects privacy and inherently provides defense in depth.
 
Two years ago, I formed the Energy Mashup Lab, a non-profit (US 501-C3) corporation whose purpose is to manage the development of open source software that enables self-assembling microgrids. The general architecture is an energy-aware inner agent, based on open-source re-implementation of the Grid-Agents code base, wrapped in one of a limited number of merchant agents (I count 8 types). A system with such software need only find the local micromarket to be a full participant in the local microgrid.
 
Block chain is a reasonable next step to base EI transaction on, and necessary to get full resilience.
 
This last year we completed an update of OBIX with strong participation from the TU Wien and the Smart Television Alliance. OBIX 1.1 now has a formal schema, defined in XSD, serializations for XML/JSON/EXI/COAP, and bindings for REST/SOAP/Web Socket.