Nathan Weaver set up an experiment to figure out how to make it safer for turtles to cross highways.

Nathan Weaver set up an experiment to figure out how to make it safer for turtles to cross highways. He “put realistic-looking rubber turtles, no bigger than a saucer, in the middle of a lane on a busy road near campus. Then he got out of the way and watched as over the next hour, seven drivers intentionally ran over the turtle, and several more appeared to try to hit the defenseless animal, but missed...One in 50 drivers ran over the dummy turtles. In itself that ratio might seem –although still awful (and not taking into account drivers aiming for but missing the turtle) not alarming, “but consider how long it take a turtle to cross the road and it becomes plain to see that road-crossing for turtles on any semi-busy road means guaranteed death.”1 Each small unkind and selfish act has not an equally small consequence but - due to the fact that the infrastructure (road) forces the tool (car) to follow a particular path - is able to destroy totally that which is its opposite (slow, vulnerable, purposeful).
New technologies get developed in an envelope of regularity that resembles this particular situation as the logic of innovation. The disruptive qualities of the potential to not only build new roads but envisage other kinds and forms of transportation, other notions of dwelling, moving, staying, going, learning, ‘being’, get snowed under the institutional tendency to make the road a little wider, better, ‘smart’.

Alexander Abad­Santos Dec 27, 2012, 12/29/12 This College Student's 'Turtle Project' Proves Humans Are Jerks ‐ National ‐ The Atlantic Wire, theatlanticwire.com/national/2012/12/college‐students‐turtle project‐proves‐humans‐are‐jerks/60388/ 1/2

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