The Internet of Things (IoT) is a vision. It is being built today. The stakeholders are known, the debate has yet to start. In hundreds of years our real needs have not changed. We want to be loved, feel safe, have fun, be relevant in work and friendship, be able to support our families and somehow play a role - however small - in the larger scheme of things. So what will really happen when things, homes and cities become smart? The result will probably be an tsunami of what at first looks like very small steps, small changes. The purpose of Council is to follow and  forecast what will happen when smart objects surround us in smart homes, offices, streets, and cities.

Greg Satell: How A Small Radio Shop Overcame Disruption And Found Itself At The Center Of The Internet Of Things

Source: “We live in an age of disruption.  As of 2011, only 67 of the original Fortune 500 companies were still in business.  Meanwhile, Gartner estimates that by 2017, 50% of the applications for the Internet of Things (IOT) will come from startups less than three years old. The truth is that success often breeds failure.  Firms develop core competencies, begin to prosper and build out a distinct model.  Then the market environment shifts


Andrew Sadauskas: IDC predicts Internet of Things market will be worth $US3.04 trillion by 2020

Source: “The worldwide market for the internet of things (IoT) is set to reach $US3.04 trillion by 2020, according to figures published last week by IDC.
 
 
The figures, published in a report titled Worldwide Internet of Things 2014-2020 Forecast: Forecast Update and Revenue by Technology Split, show around 30 billion devices are set to be connected to the internet of things by 2020.”


Carlo Ratti: Smart cities need a little chaos to innovate

Source: “ Our planet’s cities are growing at a staggering rate. Today, more than half the world’s population lives in cities.
London has grown from 1 million to 8.5 million in 140 years, while Mumbai, Lagos, Istanbul and Sao Paulo have grown by at least 200,000 people per year in recent decades, with Lagos growing by 600,000 per year – a rate of 70 people per hour.
Today’s urban space is changing rapidly. Ubiquitous computing, with its “internet of things” corollary, is creating the so-called “smart city”.


Awesome Stuff: Sound The Alarm

Source: “The Point is an interesting new take on "the internet of things" and sensors. It's a little device with a bunch of sensors designed to alert you on your phone, if it senses something is wrong in the house. If it hears breaking glass, for example, it can alert you. Or if the noise is too loud (and unlike some other devices it doesn't send the content over the internet, it just alerts you). It tracks noise, air (smoke), temperature, humidity and some other things and can send alerts and also light up differently in the home as well. It's a rather different take on these things, done in a way that doesn't feel as privacy-invasive as a number


Jeffrey Burt: Dell Sees PCs as 'Hub' of IoT

Source: “The tech vendor won't sell smartphones or wearables, but will offer the infrastructure and analytics to handle the data.
Michael Dell and other Dell executives were vocal during the three days of Dell World 2014 this week about the critical role of the PC in the company's larger initiative to grow the company's capabilities as an enterprise IT solutions and services provider. In order to be an end-to-end solutions vendor, a company needs both ends of the equation, from the PC through the data center and into the cloud, Michael Dell said several times during the show in Austin


Stephen Goldsmith: The Responsive City; engaging communities through data-smart governance

The structure of government is the problem.
Progressive government produces regressive ends in cities. It eliminated corruption and abuse of discretion with accountability and rule-based measures to make sure people weren’t abusing power. A century later - public employees are pinned in boxes. Against that we have the complexity of current society and insufficient resources in cities. Source


Abdul Basit: Drones essential for smart cities of the future

Source: “Drones are going to reshape the smart cities of the future and its commercial use will help save time and operational cost for film makers, property developers, real estate companies, logistics firms and farmers, among others. Dubai has already announced its plan to become a smart city and the emirate is preparing for its transformation into a smart city by harnessing the power of technology in order to build a new reality in the emirate. His Highness Shaikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai

  Read more about Abdul Basit: Drones essential for smart cities of the future



Nick Ochsner: Bugged Bins: Local cities tracking your trash

Source: “CHESAPEAKE
 
Three cities in Hampton Roads are using high-tech computer technology to track how often residents are recycling.
 
The technology, known as radio frequency identification, allows users to gather information using radio frequencies.
In this case, RFID chips are put on recycling bins. The chip sends information to the recycling company contracted by the city each time the bin is dumped into the truck.


Ben Bold: More women than men excited about 'internet of things'

Source: “The vast majority (83%) of women will embrace "connected living" and the "internet of things" and actively use it in their lives, compared to 80% of men, according to research from Toluna, the online research and survey technology provider. More generally, the survey found that 58% of all UK consumers are either very or quite excited about connect tech. Across the board the research unearthed greater levels of enthusiasm for the internet of things among females, with 41% of women saying they believed technology would help them organise Read more about Ben Bold: More women than men excited about 'internet of things'



Karl Mondon: Internet of Things promises benefits, downsides

Source: “Tom Coates has outfitted his San Francisco home with 13 different types of Internet-connected gadgets. He checks his smartphone connections to the hydrometer on his yucca plant, his table-top video and audio security gadgets, and his table lamp. The toy robots are not yet hooked up to the Internet.
These are examples of Internet-of-Things devices that experts fear might reveal personal data about their users:
 
— Web-connected TV: By recording what programs you watch, it could reveal everything


Stan Schneider: DDS Looms as the Industrial Internet of Things Middleware Solution

Source: “The DDS standard delivers both the extreme capabilities required by intelligent machines and the needed integration to extend to cloud-based analytics and optimization when connecting to the Industrial Internet of Things. Smart machines will change the world economy more than anything since the industrial revolution.  These smart machines will combine to form an “Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT)” that connects them into truly intelligent distributed systems. The Internet changed


D-CENT is a Europe-wide project creating privacy-aware tools and applications for direct democracy and economic empowerment.

D-CENT is a Europe-wide project creating privacy-aware tools and applications for direct democracy and economic empowerment. Together with the citizens and developers, we are creating a decentralised social networking platform for large-scale collaboration and decision-making.

The abbreviation D-CENT refers to Decentralised Citizens ENgagement Technologies.  Read more about D-CENT is a Europe-wide project creating privacy-aware tools and applications for direct democracy and economic empowerment.



John Soldatos: the joint EU-China White Paper on IoT Identification

This paper is a joint effort of IoT experts under the support of EU-China IoT Advisory Group, towards documenting the state-of-the-art on IoT Identification technologies in EU and China, as well as towards providing an outlook for future developments. As a first step the document defines the scope of IoT identification and introduces relevant concepts and mechanisms, including IoT ID Naming, Addressing and Discovery. Accordingly Read more about John Soldatos: the joint EU-China White Paper on IoT Identification



Peter Friess (DG Connect): European Research Cluster on the Internet of Things, October Newsletter

Source: “IoT is no longer science- fiction but around the corner, promising to bring smart devices everywhere, from the fridge to the car, from the home to the hospital to the city. Connected devices will be powered by intelligence (embedded or in the network) to deliver new services and applications. These applications will offer significant beneits like helping users save energy, reduce traffic jams, increase comfort, and get better healthcare and increased independence.“ Read more about Peter Friess (DG Connect): European Research Cluster on the Internet of Things, October Newsletter



Giulio Coraggio: Top 5 Internet of Things takeaways from the Web Summit


Source: “ I attended this week the Web Summit in Dublin focusing in particular to the section dedicated to the Internet of Things (IoT) from which I was able to gain very interesting insights on legal issues . And here is my top 5 chart of the most relevant legal topics:
1. Interoperability and interaction of Internet of Things devices
2. Is there a right of privacy?
3. Drones as data gathers
4. Smart city and smart home devices might make us more efficient
5. People need to know what happens to their data

  Read more about Giulio Coraggio: Top 5 Internet of Things takeaways from the Web Summit




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